Anton Chekhov on Writing

Anton_Chekhov_with_bow-tie_sepia_image2

My own experience is that once a story has been written, one has to cross out the beginning and the end. It is there that we authors do most of our lying.

—Anton Chekhov


Anton Chekhov ( 1860-1904), was a prolific Russian  playwright known for The Seagull (1895),  Uncle Vanya (1897), The Three Sisters (1901), and  The Cherry Orchard (1904).

His overall body of work has influenced writers of all genres, from Tennessee Williams, Ernest Hemingway, James Joyce, Henry Miller, Flannery O’Connor and Somerset Maugham.

Some consider Chekhov to be the founder of the modern short story. Ward no. 6 (1892), The Lady with the Little Dog (1899), A Dreary Story (aka A Boring Story) (1889), and perhaps his most well-known short stories, The Little Trilogy: The Man in a Case, Gooseberries, and About Love (1898).


Notes: 
Chekhov photo courtesy of Thinkit Creative

For summaries of Chekhov’s works, see AmericanLiterature.com

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s