Posted in From The Editor's Desk, Writing

Getting Words on the Page: Writing Routines

Like most things in life, there’s no “one size fits all” solution here. Every writer works differently and has different strengths and weaknesses, as well as a different set of personal circumstances.

  •  Journal every day, first thing, (or block out a time that works for you.)

    • Find a pretty journal or notebook that will make you look forward to it
    • Same for a pen/ pencil/ crayon/ marker
    • Leave it in a place (next to your bed, at your desk that will remind you to do it.) Don’t leave it in various places and lose it like your (*my*) keys, phone, bag…

If you’re not sure if you are a morning person or a night owl, try a few days of writing in the morning, a few days of writing at night and so on; record your output and motivation levels; and then determine which one is working best for you.

Julia Cameron discusses the idea of Morning Pages (Stream of Consciousness):

…”three pages of longhand, stream-of-consciousness writing, done first thing in the morning. [Morning pages] are not high art. They are not even ‘writing’. They are about anything and everything that crosses your mind – and they are for your eyes only.”

  • Observe what works for you

Writing requires you to forge a working relationship with yourself. Many of us aren’t taught any tools to do that, and it’s sort of an indirect task, anyway. Thus, stream of consciousness journaling, first thing. Or last thing of the day, if you have really rushed mornings.

If you’re still worried about finding the time to establish a writing routine, remember this: there’s a difference between making time for your writing, and finding time for it.

As Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu put it:

Time is a created thing. To say ‘I don’t have time,’ is like saying, ‘I don’t want to.’”

  • Set a dedicated space to work/write.

    Set a routine/ ritual to do them every day. Having that ritual will make it easier for you to get down to business.

Check out what Stephen King has to say:

There are certain things I do if I sit down to write. I have a glass of water or a cup of tea. There’s a certain time I sit down, from 8:00 to 8:30, somewhere within that half hour every morning. I have my vitamin pill and my music, sit in the same seat, and the papers are all arranged in the same places.

The cumulative purpose of doing these things the same way every day seems to be a way of saying to the mind, you’re going to be dreaming soon. It’s not any different than a bedtime routine. Do you go to bed a different way every night?”

When Haruki Murakami is working on a novel, for example, he sticks to a strict, unvarying writing routine:

I keep to this routine every day without variation. The repetition itself becomes the important thing; it’s a form of mesmerism. I mesmerise myself to reach a deeper state of mind.”

  • Another key is to get comfortable with iterations.

    Make yourself write a “bad” piece and finish it. Let it be full of adverbs, excessive sentence structures – let it flow nonlinearly in ways that make no sense. Then take a break. Then come back to it. Most of good writing comes from editing.
  • Make Writing Time Sacred

    Writing time is for writing and writing only. Being lax with it will hold back your progress. This means WRITE. Don’t do laundry, answer emails, or look at social media. Also, research and planning need to be done out of this window of time. Write Longhand, or fingers to keyboard. It doesn’t have to be perfect, that’s what editing is for – see Iterations above.
  • Set Small Goals

    Word count goals by day, or week. Think about NaNoWriMo, which sets goals for you to write in the Month of November. Write your word count down on a spreadsheet, calendar or list, daily. Seeing what you’ve accomplished in small bursts will make you want to push forward. Reward yourself at the end of the week if you make your goal. And if you don’t, DO NOT beat yourself up. Pick yourself up and know that Tomorrow is another day.

Scott Belsky (founder of Behance) states:

” It’s time to stop blaming our surroundings and start taking responsibility. While no workplace is perfect, it turns out that our gravest challenges are a lot more primal and personal. Our individual practices ultimately determine what we do and how well we do it. Specifically, it’s our routine (or lack thereof), our capacity to work proactively rather than reactively, and our ability to systematically optimize our work habits over time that determine our ability to make ideas happen.

Continue the Conversation:

Check out The Daily Routines of 12 Famous Writers https://jamesclear.com/daily-routines-writers

Join a website like 750 words. 750 words = 3 pages. https://750words.com/  

Another option : The Pomodoro Technique (yes, the tomato!) – short bursts followed by breaks. (25 minutes of work followed by a 5 minute break) https://francescocirillo.com/pages/pomodoro-technique

The Daily Routine of 20 Famous Writers: https://medium.com/the-mission/the-daily-routine-of-20-famous-writers-and-how-you-can-use-them-to-succeed-1603f52fbb77

The Psychology of Writing and the Cognitive Science of the Perfect Daily Writing Routine: https://www.brainpickings.org/2014/08/25/the-psychology-of-writing-daily-routine/

Famous Writers Sleep Habits vs. Literary Productivity, Visualized: https://www.brainpickings.org/2013/12/16/writers-wakeup-times-literary-productivity-visualization/

Book: Manage Your Day-to-Day: Build Your Routine, Find Your Focus, and Sharpen Your Creative Mind https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1477800670/braipick-20

Finally… I know it’s odd to say, but JUST WRITE.

As always, we’d love to hear what your daily routine currently looks like – let us know in the comments!

Featured image: Ernest Hemingway credit to Wikipedia Commons

Posted in Editor's Toolkit

Organizational Tips: How to Print on Index Cards

Are you a plotter or a pantser? If you plot, do you use post it notes, grocery receipts, notebooks or index cards? Do you have a binder or a system to keep them organized? Can you find them? Well, here’s how we can make your life more organized…

Or… You have them, but can you READ what you wrote down in a rush out of the shower? in the carpool lane? Those little notes you think you will be able to read with abbreviations?

The article I stumbled upon that taught me this neat trick is “How To Print On Index Cards” written by Rhonda Levine on Techwalla.com.

Instructions

  1. Before purchasing index cards, check your printer to see what is the smallest sized index card it can be configured to. Some printers will not print on the 3″ x 5″ cards. If this is the case, you can still print on the larger 4″ x 6″ cards.
  2. Place a stack of index cards in your printer tray and move the printer guide up against them to let your printer know it’s loaded with index cards.
  3. Open your word processing software (MS Word, OpenOffice, or MS Works) on your computer.
  4. From MS Word, click on the “Page Layout” tab
  5. Click on “Size” in MS Word. Set the size to either 3″ x 5″ or 4″ x 6″ depending on the size card you purchased. There is an index card setting.
  6. Change the margins in MS Word to be no more than 1/2″ all the way around.
  7. Change the page orientation to “Landscape”.
  8. If you are using OpenOffice, click on the “Format” tab on the top of the page. On the drop down list, select “Page”. Here you will be able to change the page size and define the margins. Set the page orientation to “Landscape”.
  9. If you are using MS Works, click on “File” and then select “Page Setup” from the drop down menu. Click on the “Size, Source & Orientation” tab to select the size and landscape orientation. Then, set your margins.
  10. Create your index card text.
  11. Click on the “Print” tab.

Sticky Notes?

On your wall? On your floor? All over your desk? At the bottom of your bag? In your journal? You can print on those too!

The article that taught me this nifty trick is “How To Print Typed Post-It Notes” by an ItStillWorks.com Contributor.

Instructions

  1. Download a template for typing Post-It Notes. If you prefer, you can simply make your own template for each Post-It Note, make the margins 2.5″ wide x 2.7″ high.
  2. Type your message. Decide how many custom Post-It Notes you need and type your message into each box. Use copy and paste to make this go much quicker.
  3. Print typed messages. Print the document as you normally would. Do not involve the Post-It Notes yet. Once printed, apply a Post-It Note to each typed message.
  4. Reprint. With the Post-It Notes covering the typed messages, place the paper into the manual feeder of your printer. Print the page again.
  5. Use your typed Post-It Notes and impress you friends, family or fellow workers/classmates.

Posted in Book Club, Books

Facilitating Discussion: Book Club General Questions

We’ve all been there at book club, ready to talk about the story, the characters, the plot… then silence. How do you drive the conversation? What do you do for those awkward pauses? Here’s some questions that will help facilitate the discussion.

How would you cast the film version of the book?

What character did you hate/love the most in the book and why?

What emotion were you feeling the moment you finished the book? Sad? Satisfied? Searching?

Was there a part of the book you wish you had written? Do you have any favorite lines?

What outcome did you anticipate that didn’t come to light?

Did this book remind you of any others that you’ve read?

If you could talk to the author, what question would you most like to ask him or her?

Did you learn anything?

Have you read similar books and how does this one compare?

Would you recommend this book to others?

Were you immediately engaged with the book, or did it take you a while?

Does the book remind you of any other books or writers?

Who is your favorite character?

Describe the main characters’ personality traits:
-How has the past shaped their lives?
-Do you admire or disapprove of them?
-Do they remind you of people you know?

Discuss the plot:
-Is the story interesting?
-Is the story plot-driven?
-Is the book a “page turner” or does it unfold slowly?

Discuss the book’s structure:
-Does the timeline move forward chronologically?
-Is it a continuous story – or is it interlocking short stories?
-Is there a single viewpoint or shifting viewpoints?
-Why did the author tell the story this way?

What main ideas or themes does the author explore?

If you were to guess at a formative experience in the author’s life based on this book, what would you guess?

If you were to sum up this book in one tweet, what would you say in 140 characters?

Is the ending satisfying? Has the book changed you? Have you learned something?

Posted in Book Club, Books

We Cast A Shadow by Maurice Carlos Ruffin – [Book Club]

We Cast A Shadow

by Maurice Carlos Ruffin

Published 1/29/2019

Interview with Maurice Carlos Ruffin: https://therumpus.net/2019/03/the-rumpus-interview-with-maurice-carlos-ruffin/

Element of Sacrifice: Interview with Maurice Carlos Ruffin – Paris Review: https://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2019/01/30/element-of-sacrifice-an-interview-with-maurice-carlos-ruffin/

De-Melanization Procedure: A Conversation with Maurice Carlos Ruffin – LA Review of Books: https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/de-melanization-procedure-a-conversation-with-maurice-carlos-ruffin/


ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Maurice Carlos Ruffin is the author of We Cast a Shadow, which was a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award and the PEN/Open Book Award and longlisted for the Center for Fiction First Novel Prize. A recipient of an Iowa Review Award in fiction, he has been published in Virginia Quarterly Review, AGNI, Kenyon Review, Massachusetts Review, and Unfathomable City: A New Orleans Atlas. A native of New Orleans, he is a graduate of the University of New Orleans Creative Writing Workshop and a member of the Peauxdunque Writers Alliance.

Summary:

How far would you go to protect your child?

“You can be beautiful, even more beautiful than before.” This is the seductive promise of Dr. Nzinga’s clinic, where anyone can get their lips thinned, their skin bleached, and their nose narrowed. A complete demelanization will liberate you from the confines of being born in a black body—if you can afford it.

In this near-future Southern city plagued by fenced-in ghettos and police violence, more and more residents are turning to this experimental medical procedure. Like any father, our narrator just wants the best for his son, Nigel, a biracial boy whose black birthmark is getting bigger by the day. The darker Nigel becomes, the more frightened his father feels. But how far will he go to protect his son? And will he destroy his family in the process?

This electrifying, hallucinatory novel is at once a keen satire of surviving racism in America and a profoundly moving family story. At its center is a father who just wants his son to thrive in a broken world. Maurice Carlos Ruffin’s work evokes the clear vision of Ralph Ellison, the dizzying menace of Franz Kafka, and the crackling prose of Vladimir Nabokov. We Cast a Shadow fearlessly shines a light on the violence we inherit, and on the desperate things we do for the ones we love.

As Kirkus Review says “Ruffin’s surrealist take on racism owes much to [Ralph Ellison’s] Invisible Man and George S. Schuyler’s similarly themed 1931 satire, Black No More. Yet the ominous resurgence of white supremacy during the Trump era enhances this novel’s resonance and urgency.” https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/maurice-carlos-ruffin/we-cast-a-shadow/

Listen to an audio clip excerpt:

Posted in Book Club, Books

Why Book Club?

The Bibliofile (https://the-bibliofile.com/) has said “a good book club book generally needs to be at least somewhat accessible, have some positive buzz (no one wants to read a book everyone says is garbage), and has to strike a good balance between having an eventful plot but also digging into some interesting issues everyone can get excited about discussing. It also helps if the authors are well-known.” I believe that entirely (except for the “well-known authors” part… sometimes there’s something to be said for a new, independent author who has a strong point of view… but I digress).

I also believe these are the books that keep you up till the early hours of the morning, those that you must tell your friends/ family about and “force” them to read it, because you need to talk about it with SOMEONE, and those you can tell you love since it’s carried with you everywhere, dog eared, marked, and scribbled in.  

They were meant to be shared, discussed and debated. They do not simply make you feel, they make you think, too – perhaps about something that has not occurred to you ever before. Teaching you a lesson, making you think about things differently, bringing you to a different time / place.  It’s a wonderful kind of alchemy; finding a story and set of characters that move, challenge or teach you something, never feels anything less than miraculous.

This is why book club is so important, be it in person at a house, in the coffee shop, or over zoom or some form of technology during the pandemic. It gets you thinking and exchanging ideas and opinions. If you haven’t joined a book club, why not start now!

Posted in Book Club, Books

The Yellow House by Sarah M. Broom [A Book Club Discussion]

The Yellow House
by Sarah M. Broom

Published: 2019-08-13
New York: Grove Press

— Currently reading this for @BookNOLA club choice for February 2021 —
Want to join us? https://twitter.com/BookNola

Winner of the 2019 National Book Award in Nonfiction
Named one of the 10 Best Books of the Year by the New York Times

“A book of great ambition, Sarah M. Broom’s memoir tells a hundred years of her family and their relationship to home in a neglected area of one of America’s most mythologized cities. This is the story of a mother’s struggle against a house’s entropy, and that of a prodigal daughter who left home only to reckon with the pull that home exerts, even after the Yellow House was wiped off the map after Hurricane Katrina. The Yellow House expands the map of New Orleans to include the stories of its lesser-known natives, demonstrating how enduring drives of clan, pride, and familial love resist and defy erasure.”

About the Author:

Sarah M. Broom is a writer whose work has appeared in the New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, The Oxford American, and O, The Oprah Magazine among others. She was awarded a Whiting Foundation Creative Nonfiction Grant in 2016 and was a finalist for the New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship in Creative Nonfiction in 2011. She has also been awarded fellowships at Djerassi Resident Artists Program and MacDowell. She lives in New York.

Author’s Website: https://www.sarahmbroom.com/

Author’s Interview (PBS News Hour):
https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/author-sarah-broom-on-the-yellow-house-and-putting-new-orleans-east-on-the-map (7:27)

Interview with Sarah M. Broom – National Book Award Finalist https://www.writersdigest.com/getting-published/the-yellow-house-sarah-m-broom

Discussion Questions

On perspective:

At the opening of the story, Sarah Broom describes the lot where the Yellow House once stood from fifteen thousand feet above, saying that from those great heights, her brother Carl, who tends the space, would not be seen.

Have you ever brought up a Google Earth image of your house from above and zoomed out? What impact did seeing your home, your street, your state, your country shrink in comparison to the world have on your perspective?

On birth order:

When the author calls her eldest brother, Simon, in North Carolina “to explain all the things I want to know and why, he expresses worry that by writing this all down here, I will disrupt, unravel, and tear down everything the Broom family has ever built.” He tells her he’d like to live in the future and forget about the past. (p. 8)

The twelfth of twelve children, Broom works hard to reconstruct the life that came before her and to cleave it to the life she knew in the Yellow House and after, to make sense of a whole and to connect it to place. What role do you think birth order plays in her desire to preserve vs. Simon’s need to forget? Who is the keeper of the history in your family and who places more value on the present?

On place vs. story:

Sarah Broom’s brother Carl, the seventh of twelve, occupies the space—keeps the space—where the Yellow House sat long after it’s gone. She describes this occupation (p. 3): “Sometimes you can find Carl alone on our lot, poised on an ice chest, searching the view, as if for a sign, as if for a wonder.” She says he is “babysitting ruins. But that is not his language or sentiment; he would never betray the Yellow House like that.”

Do some people in your family tend to place—to “babysit ruins”—and others to story? Have you ever tried to keep a place alive by occupying it after the circumstances that led you to being there in the first place ended? What do you think it means to Carl to stay?

On names:

The author refers to Hurricane Katrina throughout as “the Water.”

Why do you think she made this choice? Describe what “the Water” communicates to you, and how it changed over the course of the book. Do you think it will be the same for every reader?

On family firsts:

On p. 57, Broom writes: “Mom paid for her house with money from Webb’s life insurance policy. She was nineteen years old, the first in her immediate family to own a house, a dream toward which her own mother, Lolo, still bent all of her strivings.”

Who accomplished these kinds of firsts in your family? Were they long-ago accomplishments or more recent? What kinds of sacrifices or good-willed pitching in were made and by whom to help make them possible?

On the growing-up world:

In the chapter “Map of My World,” the author describes five points on the map that make (p. 117) “my growing-up world.”

What are some of the places that you can still inhabit vividly in your mind’s eye? Why do you think those stuck and not others? Why do you think the points in the author’s growing-up world stuck with her so strongly?

On the long-term impact of catastrophe:

During the Water, Broom writes, “All told, we scatter in three cardinal directions, nine runny spots on the map.” Even after it recedes, most remain dispersed. How do climate events like the hurricane impact families, employment, housing prices? What effect do you think this kind of scattering after climate crises has on regional culture?

On Chef Menteur Highway:

Chef Menteur Highway plays an integral, “sinister” role in The Yellow House. On p. 6 the author states: “The name, translated from French, means ‘chief liar.’ ”

What are the truths we think we know about New Orleans compared to the story Broom tells? What other cities present the same kinds of half truths? Have you ever stumbled into a neighborhood in a city you thought you knew that told a different story?

On John McDonogh Day:

The author tells us, “John McDonogh was a wealthy slave owner who in 1850 bequeathed half of his estate to New Orleans public schools, insisting that his money be used for ‘the establishment and support of free schools wherein the poor and the poor only and of both sexes and classes and castes of color shall have admittance.’” We are then told how the black students must wait in the heat on the day that celebrates McDonogh, while white students pay tribute to him first.

Are there widely accepted/institutionalized holidays or rituals you can think of that exclude or erase certain people, or situations in which symbolism has been deemed more important than the wellness of the participants? Thinking about the role of symbolism and ritual in cultural bonding, whose culture is McDonogh Day intended to bond, and at what cost?

On parenting then and now:

On p. 37, the author writes about children’s place in an adult world and the role adults played in teaching them the facts of life: “In those days, children did not speak openly to their parents. ‘Get out from grown folks’ business,’ you were told. Whatever we found out, we found out on our own.”

Who were your youthful “teachers”? Tell one story about a friend/sister/ brother who schooled you on something parents didn’t talk to their kids about when you were young. How solid was the advice? Parents pride themselves on being open with their kids these days, but has something been lost?

On hard memories vs. good ones:

Broom writes almost in the same breath of harsh memories like having racial epithets hurled at them by their transient white neighbors in the trailer park, Oak Haven, across the street, and of the weekly parties Ivory Mae and Simon threw and movies projected on the not-yet-Yellow House (p. 68), “the side of the house becoming, for a night, the greatest movie screen.”

What kinds of institutionalized or other hardships are you able to square with happier memories from your childhood? What bright memories stick out as balancing more difficult times? What seem the most difficult circumstances to square for the Broom family before the Water?

On unspoken boundaries:

The author states that the adults on the street for the most part stayed out of each other’s houses (p. 87), “unless there was good cause,” like when “Ms. Octavia’s . . . husband, Alvin, died.”

Do you have friendly longtime neighbors whose houses you’ve never been in until there was some kind of emergency? What makes people draw the line at the front door with people they’ve chatted on the lawn with for years?

Likewise, during the eldest daughter, Deborah’s, wedding reception, the author says (p. 98) it “mostly held to the outdoors, but people still wandered inside, to the bathroom, and then others went in just to see what we had, Mom was convinced.” Ivory Mae felt that “the objects contained within a house spoke loudest about the person to whom the things belonged. More than that, she believed that the individual belonged to the things inside the house, to the house itself.” For Ivory Mae, this intrusion began what the author calls “the shifty settling in of shame.”

Sometimes objects simply reveal surprising details about a person. Are there objects that expose a part of you that you hold sacred and prefer to protect? Are there common objects in plain sight that reveal everything to close friends but nothing to strangers? What are the objects in the Yellow House that reveal the most about the characters?

On land development:

Talking about the land deals that never come to fruition in New Orleans East, the author writes that (p. 88): “there were more paved roads than walkways— certain parts of the East were best driven through. Landscapes communicate feeling. Walking, you can grab on to the texture of a place, get up close to the human beings who make it, but driving makes distance, grows fear.”

Are there parts of your town that have been developed in such a way that they suppress a sense of community rather than inspire it? Alternately, have you seen development that made an abandoned or wrecked part of your city or town suddenly come alive? Was there anything that could have been done differently on the swath of land in New Orleans East that would have changed the outcome?

On Simon’s death:

After Simon dies, the house, with so many children and so much responsibility, falls into chaos. Routines fall apart. The boys get in trouble. Ivory Mae has to depend on public transportation or rides to get anywhere. She says (p. 114), “I was a little pathetic at first. I needed to make myself know things.” When she finally learns to drive after a couple of failed strategies, she says, “It was my Independence Day.”

Has there ever been a time in your life that has forced you to recalibrate, to remake yourself into someone who’s brave in a novel way in order to meet challenges in unfamiliar territory or in territory that has suddenly been rendered unfamiliar by an event? What does this reveal about Ivory Mae?

On the ground:

The author speaks frequently of the “squishy earth” (p. 123) being “eaten by it.” Something as ordinary and foundational as the earth beneath her feet is routinely described as being untrustworthy. She writes: “In our child-wise minds, the seal between deep ground and our present reality above that ground is string thin.”

What real threats/facts of life did you and the kids around you know when you were growing up that turned out to be spot-on and not just boogie men or childhood exaggeration?

On selective vision:

The author is nearly legally blind and describes living in a “blurry” world until she is ten years old. When her mother discovers her vision problem, Ivory Mae buys glasses for Sarah, who up until that point has been perhaps mercifully shielded from some of the details in her life. Then, walking home from school one day, with twenty-twenty eyesight for the first time, “one detail overwhelms them all.” She writes (p. 135): “Our side of Wilson Avenue, the short end, seems a no-matter place where police cars routinely park, women’s heads bobbing up and down in the driver’s seat.” After that, she tries “not to see what is right in front of my face. Sometimes, when I want the world to go blurry again, I remove my glasses when passing by these scenes. In this way, I learn to see and to go blind at will.”

What kinds of things have you tried not to see in your own city or neighborhood? What do you think the author was genuinely aware of before the glasses?

On middle school:

The author writes about smiling “with abandon, goofy-like” (p. 136) when she is in sixth grade and proudly posing with her Edward Livingston Middle School honors sash. In the next breath, middle school goes Lord of the Flies. The “school hallways hold contests of a lurid sort.” And (p. 140) “some days we have substitute teachers who seem called in from off the street. Many times, the substitute puts a movie into the VCR that has nothing to do with the subject matter or with learning. Everything in the world feels stupid then.” Later, “We had become a horde, to be gathered and made to ‘act right,’ indistinguishable from one another.” Overnight honors students become fighters, cynicism creeps in replacing goofy pride, and order dissolves into chaos.

What moments in middle school stick out to you as being turning points? What messages do you think these students are responding to? How does Broom describe her evolution when she changes from Livingston Middle School to Word of Faith? Is Word of Faith a “good school”? Reflect, as well, on times you have moved from one social situation to another and how you could, or could not, decide how to present yourself.

On duality:

Throughout The Yellow House the author repeats Ivory Mae’s words: “You know this house not all that comfortable for other people.” But further she says: “My mother was raised by my grandmother Lolo to make a beautiful home; I love to make beauty out of ordinary spaces. I had not known this back when I was living inside the Yellow House, but I knew it in my adult years when I created rooms that people gravitated to, the kind generally described as warm. Once, a friend came to one of these made places, an apartment in Harlem, and sat in the parlor looking around. The room had made him feel alive, even happy to be alive, he said. And then, ‘You have things to make a home with.’ People are always telling me this.” At the same time she writes about the shame of bringing people to the house she grew up in because of its deteriorating condition, of the friends she and her sister never make because of the inherent threat of having to invite them over. But (p. 148): “America required these dualities anyway and we were good at presenting our double selves. The house, unlike the clothes our mother had tailored to us, was an ungainly fit.”

What kinds of duality do you live with? Are some kinds easier to live with than others?

On “the Water”:

The events of the Water are described as they are occurring in real time, often through Broom’s interviews with her siblings and mother. We see Carl awaken to the storm flooding his house and flee to the attic from which, by daybreak, he has to cut his way out through the roof. Or the author narrates her brother Michael in the midst of the chaos (p. 207): “The men foraged for food and other items from broken-in stores, eventually finding an air mattress and two boats. Whatever you needed and the last thing on earth you needed could be found, it seemed, in the dirty, fetid water.” Meanwhile in Harlem, Broom is desperately scanning the news channels in search of (p. 202): “Carl’s white cotton socks pulled up high, size 13 feet.” Searching for the faces of “my beloveds.”

How does the switch in narrative tone impact you as a reader? When Michael and his group are rescued (p. 207) does it seem to you that they can truly feel safe? Can you see yourself braving “fetid water” to find food and essential supplies for your family, or imagine being unable to contact your “beloveds” in catastrophic circumstances? With this in mind, think about Broom’s trip to join her family in California at last, and hiding in her brother Byron’s bathroom (p. 210) “writing scenes into a notebook instead of feeling.” Does this differ from her description of writing prior to this? What information does Broom give us about the fate of New Orleans’s population after the storm that was new to you?

Discuss how The Yellow House both upholds and subverts the conventions of the memoir genre

Reader/s should be able to analyze how Broom writes about her family’s history in the years before she was born, as well as how this inclusion of family history is a departure from the traditional memoir style which is featured in the rest of the book.

SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER READING:

Louis Armstrong, Satchmo: My Life in New Orleans
Gaston Bachelard, The Poetics of Space
James Baldwin, Nobody Knows My Name, Notes of a Native Son, Going to Meet the Man, 
Giovanni’s Room
Richard Campanella, Bienville’s Dilemma
J. M. Coetzee, Boyhood
Joan Didion, Where I Was From
Bessie Head, A Woman Alone
Zora Neale Hurston, Tell My Horse
Jamaica Kincaid, A Small Place, Autobiography of My Mother
Albert Murray, South to a Very Old Place
Marilynne Robinson, Housekeeping
W. G. Sebald, The Emigrants, Austerlitz
Peter Turchi, Maps of the Imagination: The Writer as Cartographer
John Edgar Wideman, Brothers and Keepers
Isabel Wilkerson, The Warmth of Other Suns

Posted in book lists, Books

2021 books I want to read (TBR) list

The new year is the perfect time to set new reading goals! This is my “want to read” list, my “TBR” List, the get off the computer and spend some time reading in the corner of the couch with a cup of coffee and get lost in a land of other worlds. Come along with me, let me know what’s on your TBR list!

Come back often, I will be adding more to this list and also letting you know what I thought of these… (hopefully!)

At the Wolf’s Table: A Novel

by Rosella Postorino

(February 11, 2020)

Summary: Based on a true story, At the Wolf’s Table centers around twenty-six-year-old Rosa Sauer who is conscripted, along with nine other women, to become one of Hitler’s tasters. Resentment and secrets begin to grow as a divide is formed within the group of women: on one side, those who are loyal to Hitler and on the other, those who insist they’re not, even as they risk their lives for him. Soon, everyone begins to wonder if they’re on the wrong side of history.

Want to read this for your book club? Discussion Questions:

ABOUT THE BOOK

They called it the Wolfsschanze, the Wolf’s Lair. “Wolf” was his nickname. As hapless as Little Red Riding Hood, I had ended up in his belly. A legion of hunters was out looking for him, and to get him in their grips they would gladly slay me as well.

Germany, 1943: Twenty-six-year-old Rosa Sauer’s parents are gone, and her husband Gregor is far away, fighting on the front lines of World War II. Impoverished and alone, she makes the fateful decision to leave war-torn Berlin to live with her in-laws in the countryside, thinking she’ll find refuge there. But one morning, the SS come to tell her she has been conscripted to be one of Hitler’s tasters: three times a day, she and nine other women go to his secret headquarters, the Wolf’s Lair, to eat his meals before he does.

Forced to eat what might kill them, the tasters begin to divide into The Fanatics, those loyal to Hitler, and the women like Rosa who insist they aren’t Nazis, even as they risk their lives every day for Hitler’s. As secrets and resentments grow, this unlikely sisterhood reaches its own dramatic climax, as everyone begins to wonder if they are on the wrong side of history.

THE DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

Though she risks her life every day for Hitler, Rosa claims not to be a Nazi. Do you agree? How is her involvement in the war similar to or different from her husband Gregor’s, who enlisted to fight?


Rosa imagines her father telling her: “You’re responsible for any regime you tolerate. … Each person’s existence is granted by the system of the state in which she lives, even that of a hermit, can’t you understand that? You’re not free from political guilt, Rosa.” Do you agree? How does this novel address the idea of collective guilt in Germany? Are any of the characters innocent?


Rosa never meets Hitler, but his presence hangs over the entire novel. What role does he play in the story? Discuss the different ways in which the characters view him.


Rosa compares herself to Little Red Riding Hood, and Hitler to the wolf: “I had ended up in his belly. A legion of hunters was out looking for him, and to get him in their grips they would gladly slay me as well.” Do you think the comparison holds up? Are there other fairy-tale elements to Rosa’s story?


Rosa describes her love with Gregor as either “a mouth that doesn’t bite, or the opportunity to unexpectedly attack the other, like a dog that turns against its master.” What does she mean? How do we see that duality—safety and danger—in her relationships throughout the novel?


Rosa keeps secrets from her loved ones from a very early age. She says of her childhood relationship with her mother: “My pain at the wrong I had done to her was so great that the only way to bear it was to love my mother less, to say nothing, to keep it a secret. The only way to survive my love for my mother was to betray that love.” Discuss that apparent paradox. How else do secrets shape Rosa’s life and relationships?


Rosa tells us: “The ability to adapt is human beings’ greatest resource, but the more I adapted, the less human I felt.” What do you think she means? How does this novel address sacrifice and survival?


Rosa never asks Albert directly about his experience at the concentration camps: “I was afraid and couldn’t speak and didn’t want to know.” What do you make of their relationship? What draws them together and keeps them apart? Do you consider Albert a villain in this story? Does Rosa’s romantic involvement with him make her guilty or culpable in some way?


Rosa argues, “There’s no such thing as universal compassion—only being moved to compassion before the fate of a single human being.” Do you think there’s any truth to that? How does the novel either bear out or contradict that statement?


Much of this novel is about female friendship. What is the nature of Rosa’s relationships with the other tasters? How does her outsider status, as a Berliner rather than a villager, play a role? How does this novel address issues of class and status, particularly through Rosa’s friendship with the Baroness?


Yellow Wife: A Novel

by Sadeqa Johnson

(January 21, 2021)

Summary: Called “simply enchanting” by New York Times bestselling author Lisa Wingate, this harrowing story follows an enslaved woman forced to barter love and freedom while living in the most infamous slave jail in Virginia.

Want to read this for your book club? Discussion Questions:

ABOUT THE BOOK

Born on a plantation in Charles City, Virginia, Pheby Delores Brown has lived a relatively sheltered life. Shielded by her mother’s position as the estate’s medicine woman and cherished by the Master’s sister, she is set apart from the others on the plantation, belonging to neither world.

She’d been promised freedom on her eighteenth birthday, but instead of the idyllic life she imagined with her true love, Essex Henry, Pheby is forced to leave the only home she has ever known. She unexpectedly finds herself thrust into the bowels of slavery at the infamous Devil’s Half Acre, a jail in Richmond, Virginia, where the enslaved are broken, tortured, and sold every day. There, Pheby is exposed not just to her Jailer’s cruelty but also to his contradictions. To survive, Pheby will have to outwit him, and she soon faces the ultimate sacrifice.

THE DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

When Pheby is moved to work in the house for Missus Delphina, she has a moment where she sits in Missus Delphina’s chair and uses her hairbrush. She looks in the mirror and muses “with a little rouge and a proper gown, I could fit in like a member of the family.”Why would Pheby want to fit in like a member of the family? In what ways did this scene foreshadow what would happen to Pheby in adulthood?


Why do you think Miss Sally took an interest in Pheby? In what ways do you think that her influence affected Pheby’s personality and outlook on her future predicaments?


When Pheby is serving dinner to Master Jacob and Missus Delphina, she is instructed to stand against the wall and pretend not to listen. She says, “Mama always said the way to keep peace with white folks was to be available and invisible at the same time.” How does this resonate with modern times and what are the current socio-political implications of this?


Though Missus Delphina is aware that Pheby is Master Jacob’s daughter, she seems to take her wrath out on Pheby rather than her mother Ruth.Why do you think this is?


In the novel, children are portrayed oftentimes as either a source of joy for a family, a blessing or a source of sorrow and tragedy.There are many scenes of mothers losing children in a myriad of ways. Discuss the sacrifices enslaved mothers had to make during this time in history.


Compare and contrast Pheby and Essex’s treatments as a man and woman within the institution of slavery. In what way was their different modes of survival different based on their genders?


What was it about Pheby that made the Jailer choose her? Even when he fathered children with other enslaved women, why do you think he chose to keep Pheby as the mistress of the jail?


Many times, Pheby wants Monroe to speak “properly” like her. Monroe is afraid to do so in case he is punished for it. She says to him: “People will judge you on the way that you speak.” To which Monroe responds: “Silver-head man did not like me speaking like white folk…told me to watch my uppity ways.” Discuss speaking styles such as improper or proper ways of speaking and what it means for Monroe and Pheby’s survival. In what ways does the way we talk or how we use language define us?


Pheby is anything but a damsel in distress.Where do you think her strength and resilience comes from? How do you think she endures her life with the Jailer in the parts of her story we don’t get to know?


Pheby describes the Jailer as looking at her with love in his eyes. Historians of slavery, particularly black feminist historians, have fiercely contested narratives (both fiction and nonfiction) that encourages such an interpretation, insisting that there could be no love between master and enslaved. Most see these “romantic” relationships as simply rape. What are your thoughts on their relationship? Could the Jailer, as Pheby’s oppressor, actually love her?


What were the dangers of Pheby’s daughters passing as white women in post-bellum society? Why do you think Birdie chose to stay with her mother and to not pass for white? Compare and contrast Birdie and Hester’s childhood and personalities and why they chose their own separate paths.


The Starless Sea

by Erin Morgenstern

(2019)

“What if, when you were at that age when you fall down rabbit holes or you find your door to Narnia, you didn’t take that opportunity when it was given? What if you didn’t follow that rabbit down the rabbit hole? Does that rabbit haunt you years later? Do you still think about the rabbit?” —Erin Morgenstern

In her follow-up to The New York Times bestselling novel, The Night Circus, Erin Morgenstern’s The Starless Sea tells a timeless love story set in a secret underground world — a place of pirates, painters, lovers, liars, and ships that sail upon a starless sea. 

Summary: Zachary Ezra Rawlins is a graduate student in Vermont when he discovers a mysterious book hidden in the stacks.

As he turns the pages, entranced by tales of lovelorn prisoners, key collectors, and nameless acolytes, he reads something strange: a story from his own childhood.

Bewildered by this inexplicable book and desperate to make sense of how his own life came to be recorded, Zachary uncovers a series of clues—a bee, a key, and a sword—that lead him to a masquerade party in New York, to a secret club, and through a doorway to an ancient library hidden far below the surface of the earth.

What Zachary finds in this curious place is more than just a buried home for books and their guardians—it is a place of lost cities and seas, lovers who pass notes under doors and across time, and of stories whispered by the dead.

Zachary learns of those who have sacrificed much to protect this realm, relinquishing their sight and their tongues to preserve this archive, and also of those who are intent on its destruction.

Together with Mirabel, a fierce, pink-haired protector of the place, and Dorian, a handsome, barefoot man with shifting alliances, Zachary travels the twisting tunnels, darkened stairwells, crowded ballrooms, and sweetly soaked shores of this magical world, discovering his purpose—in both the mysterious book and in his own life. (From the publisher.)

Want to read this for your book club? Discussion Questions:

Discussion Questions

1. Talk about the underground realm of the Starless Sea. How would you describe the library to someone who has never read the book?

2. Three of the book’s most prominent symbols, in a book full of them, are a sword, a key, and a bee. What is the role each symbol plays in the book and what does each signify, or represent?

3. One of the novel’s central ideas is that we are our stories. How does this theme unfold during the course of the story?

4. (Follow-up to Question 3) In what way is this book about Zachary’s life story—that as a child he made a choice not to open a magical door? What does he learn throughout this book about how that decision altered his life? What about turning points in your own life. Do you think back on some of them and wonder how a different decision might have led you on a completely different path?

5. (Follow-up to Question 4) The novel asks the question, if a single decision can alter the direction of our lives, to what degree are we in charge of our own stories/lives? Are our lives subject to fate, or destiny?

6. In what way is The Starless Sea also about how stories take over our lives? Zachary, for instance is presented with “a labyrinthine of tunnels and rooms filled with stories.” How can he (or we) not be drawn in?

7. Morgenstern has packed her novel with literary allusions. Even Zachary’s own name contains three of them. Can you unpack others: consider works by Lewis Carroll, Neil Gaiman, J.K. Rowling. J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, Jules Verne. Can you identify others? Are the literary references clever “affectations,” or do they actually affect the plot of the novel?

8. Which of the mysterious characters were you most puzzled by… intrigued by… or drawn to? Take any one of the following, for instance: Rhyme, the Keeper, Mirabel (is she Fate…or is she the Moon?), Allegra, Eleanor, and Simon. Any others?

9. Zachary observes at one point that reading a novel is like “playing a game where all the choices have been made for you ahead of time by someone who is much better at this particular game.” Care to comment on that statement?

10. What was your experience reading The Starless Sea? Was it what you had hoped for? More than you’d hoped for? Less? Did you find yourself entering a world of enchantment… or a cluttered, confusing world? In other words, were you pleased or disappointed? How would you compare this book to Morgenstern’s first, The Night Circus?


The Vanishing Half: A Novel

by Brit Bennett

(June 2, 2020)

Summary: “The Vanishing Half” by Brit Bennett is one of the most talked about books of the year — a stunning page-turner about twin sisters, inseparable as children, who ultimately choose to live in two very different worlds: one black, and one white. It’s a powerful story about family, compassion, identity and roots.

ABOUT THE BOOK

An Instant #1 New York Times Bestseller and GOOD MORNING AMERICA Book Club Pick! 

From The New York Times-bestselling author of The Mothers, a stunning new novel about twin sisters, inseparable as children, who ultimately choose to live in two very different worlds, one black and one white.

The Vignes twin sisters will always be identical. But after growing up together in a small, southern black community and running away at age sixteen, it’s not just the shape of their daily lives that is different as adults, it’s everything: their families, their communities, their racial identities. Many years later, one sister lives with her black daughter in the same southern town she once tried to escape. The other secretly passes for white, and her white husband knows nothing of her past. Still, even separated by so many miles and just as many lies, the fates of the twins remain intertwined. What will happen to the next generation, when their own daughters’ storylines intersect?

Weaving together multiple strands and generations of this family, from the Deep South to California, from the 1950s to the 1990s, Brit Bennett produces a story that is at once a riveting, emotional family story and a brilliant exploration of the American history of passing. Looking well beyond issues of race, The Vanishing Half considers the lasting influence of the past as it shapes a person’s decisions, desires, and expectations, and explores some of the multiple reasons and realms in which people sometimes feel pulled to live as something other than their origins.

THE DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

The title of this novel is The Vanishing Half. Why do you think the author selected that title?


Stella and Desiree Vignes grow up identical and, as children, inseparable. Later, they are not only separated, but lost to each other, completely out of contact. What series of events and experiences leads to this division and why? Was it inevitable, after their growing up so indistinct from each other?


When did you notice cracks between the twins begin to form? Do you understand why Stella made the choice she did? What did Stella have to give up, in order to live a different kind of life? Was it necessary to leave Desiree behind? Do you think Stella ultimately regrets her choices? What about Desiree?


Consider the various forces that shape the twins into the people they become, and the forces that later shape their respective daughters. In the creation of an individual identity or sense of self, how much influence do you think comes from upbringing, geography, race, gender, class, education? Which of these are mutable and why? Have you ever taken on or discarded aspects of your own identity?


The town of Mallard is small in size but looms large in the personal histories of its residents. How does the history of this town and its values affect the twins and their parents; how does it affect “outsiders” like Early and later Jude? Do you understand why Desiree decides to return there as an adult? What does the depiction of Mallard say about who belongs to what communities, and how those communities are formed and enforced?


Many of the characters are engaged in a kind of performance at some point in the story. Kennedy makes a profession of acting, and ultimately her fans blur the line between performance and reality when they confuse her with her soap opera character. Barry performs on stage in theatrical costumes that he then removes for his daytime life. Reese takes on a new wardrobe and role, but it isn’t a costume. One could say that Stella’s whole marriage and neighborhood life is a kind of performance. What is the author saying about the roles we perform in the world? Do you ever feel you are performing a role rather than being yourself? How does that compare to what some of these characters are doing? Consider the distinction between performance, reinvention, and transformation in respect to the different characters in the book.


Desiree’s job as a fingerprint analyst in Washington DC is to use scientific methods to identify people through physical, genetic details. Why do you think the author chose this as a profession for her character? Where else do you see this theme of identity and identification in the book?


Compare and contrast the love relationships in the novel –Desiree and Early, Stella and Blake, and Reese and Jude. What are their separate relationships with the truth? How much does telling the truth or obscuring it play a part in the functionality of a relationship? How much does the past matter in each case?


What does Stella feel she has to lose in California, if she reveals her true identity to her family and her community? When Loretta, a black woman, moves in across the street, what does she represent for Stella? What do Stella’s interactions with Loretta tell us about Stella’s commitment to her new identity?


Kennedy is born with everything handed to her, Jude with comparatively little. What impact do their relative privileges have on the people they become? How does it affect their relationships with their mothers and their understanding of home? How does it influence the dynamic between them?



Posted in Fictional Feasts, Literary Gastronomy, Literature

Fictional Feasts / Literary Gastronomy, part 2

Welcome back for Literary Gastronomy, Part 2.

“Ask not what you can do for your country. Ask what’s for lunch.” – Orson Welles

Charles Dickens’ “Great Expectations” (1861): Toasted Almond-bride cake

“As I looked along the yellow expanse out of which I remember its seeming to grow, like a black fungus, I saw speckled-legged spiders with blotchy bodies running home to it, and running out from it . . . ‘I can’t guess what it is, ma’am.’ ‘It’s a great cake. A bride-cake. Mine!’”

Ann Leckie “Ancillary Justice” (2013): Fancy tea. 

“Tea was for officers. For humans. Ancillaries drank water. Tea was an extra, unnecessary expense. A luxury.” Breq in Ancillary Justice

Markus Zusak’s “The Book Thief” (2005): Vanilla Kipferls ( crescent cookies)

Growing up in the southern suburbs of Sydney, Australia, my family was a small oddity; our last name wasn’t Smith, Jones, or Johnson. Even as kids, we knew that our parents—who had immigrated separately from Germany and Austria—had brought a whole different world with them when they came to Australia. This was often felt most around Christmas, when we celebrated on Christmas Eve as opposed to Christmas Day. We cooked up weisswurst and leberkase and rouladen, with kraut and potato salad, and everything happened in the night.

The other memory I have of that time, of course, is the sweet things. For starters, my mother would make colossal gingerbread slabs and fashion them into houses. Sometimes her construction work was sound. Sometimes it wasn’t.

Us kids would decorate the houses with icing and lollies that ranged from smarties (like M&M’s), freckles, crunchie bars, and jaffas. The jaffas always went along the top, on the ridge. Sometimes small pretzels also found their way onto those rooftops, and it really was the time of our lives, especially given that we felt deprived all year of these things! Of course, we loved it when the houses collapsed as we decorated them—it just meant that they had to be eaten immediately . . . so there was always plenty going on at our place around Christmas.

Next to the gingerbread houses, the accompanying ritual was the making of Vanillekipferl. This is technically the wrong plural—in German there’s no s on the end—but I’ll go with the English version here. As a child, I remember making the mixture and taking clumps of it and rolling it into a long sausage. We would then chop it into the sizes we wanted and make them into horseshoe shapes.

Of course, these cookies were always best made on cold days, which can be hard to come by in Australia around December. Still, that’s what I do now. As soon as there’s a cooler day in the lead-up to Christmas, I start making Vanillekipferl. For the first time this year, I made them with my daughter, who just turned four. That’s the other good thing about this recipe. Kids can easily get involved. The ingredients are minimal, and if you destroy a cookie or two in the dough-making, it doesn’t matter. You just squash it up and try again.

The only warning I offer apart from choosing the right day to make them is that no matter how well you make these cookies, they’ll never taste as good as your mother’s. It’s just the way it goes.

Aimee Bender’s “The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake” (2010): Lemon Cake

My birthday cake was her latest project because it was not from a mix but instead built from scratch—the flour, the baking soda, lemon-flavored because at eight that had been my request; I had developed a strong love for sour. We’d looked through several cookbooks together to find just the right one, and the smell in the kitchen was overpoweringly pleasant. To be clear: the bite I ate was delicious. Warm citrus-baked batter lightness enfolded by cool deep dark swirled sugar.

Because the goodness of the ingredients—the fine chocolate, the freshest lemons—seemed like a cover over something larger and darker, and the taste of what was underneath was beginning to push up from the bite….None of it was a bad taste, so much, but there was a kind of lack of wholeness to the flavors that made it taste hollow, like the lemon and chocolate were just surrounding a hollowness

Lewis Carroll’s “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” (1865): Queen of Hearts Tarts

“In the next moment, her eyes fell on the White Rabbit that was serving the court as a herald and was reading the accusation that the Knave of Hearts had stolen the Queen’s tarts. In the middle of the court, a large platter of tarts was on display.”

Fannie Flagg’s “Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe” (1987): Fried Green Tomatoes

“Idgie and Ruth had set a place for him at a table. He sat down to a plate of fried chicken, black-eyed peas, turnip greens, fried green tomatoes, cornbread, and iced tea.”

Astrid Lindgren’s “Pippi Longstocking” (1945, Sweden): sandwiches, pancakes, sausages, pineapple pudding

“And they shouted with delight when they saw all the good things Pippi had set out on the bare rock. There were lovely little sandwiches of meatloaf and ham, a whole pile of pancakes sprinkled with sugar, little brown sausages, and three pineapple puddings.”

Louise Fitzhugh’s “Harriet the Spy” (1964): Tomato Sandwiches

“‘Listen, Harriet, you’ve taken a tomato sandwich to school every day for five years. Don’t you get tired of them?’
‘No.’”

A.A. Milne’s “Winnie the Pooh” (1926): Honey

“‘Well,’ said Pooh, ‘it’s the middle of the night, which is a good time for going to sleep. And to-morrow morning we’ll have some honey for breakfast. Do Tiggers like honey?’
‘They like everything,’ said Tigger cheerfully.”

What’s your favorite literary recipe or reference? Leave a comment down below!

Posted in Books, Fictional Feast, Literary Gastronomy

Fictional Feasts / Literary Gastronomy, part 1

Virginia Woolf, who placed much emphasis upon dining within her works, famously said that “one cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well” ( A Room of One’s Own, 1929).

I bought the book Fictitious Dishes: An Album of Literature’s Most Memorable Meals (HarperCollins, April 2014) when it came out, because how could one not! As an avid reader, I always paid attention to the meals that the characters were having, looking for their raison d’être: did it bring back a memory of family, was it the first meal you had with your (soon to be) significant other; what did J.D. Salinger mean when he picked the cheese sandwich for “Catcher in the Rye”, or Lucy Maud Montgomery for the raspberry cordial of “Anne of Green Gables”.

Come with me as we travel the pages of literature to indulge with the characters, revealing everyday life and its rituals.

Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road” (1957): Apple Pie & Ice Cream 

“I ate apple pie and ice cream—it was getting better as I got deeper into Iowa, the pie bigger, the ice cream richer…that’s practically all I ate all the way across the country, I knew it was nutritious and it was delicious, of course.”

Thomas Harris’ “The Silence of the Lambs” (1988): Liver, Fava beans and a nice Chianti*

“A census taker tried to quantify me once. I ate his liver with some fava beans and a big Amarone. Go back to school, little Starling.” 

*Ed Note: the Chianti is the movie line.

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby” (1925): Cold Fried Chicken and Ale

“Daisy and Tom were sitting opposite each other at the kitchen table with a plate of cold fried chicken between them and two bottles of ale. He was talking intently across the table at her and in his earnestness his hand had fallen upon and covered her own. Once in a while she looked up and nodded at him in agreement.”

Bonus Food for “The Great Gatsby”: Mint Juleps 

And we all took the less explicable step of engaging the parlor of a suite in the Plaza Hotel.

The prolonged and tumultuous argument that ended by herding us into that room eludes me, though I have a sharp physical memory that, in the course of it, my underwear kept climbing like a damp snake around my legs and intermittent beads of sweat raced cool across my back. The notion originated with Daisy’s suggestion that we hire five bath-rooms and take cold baths, and then assumed more tangible form as “a place to have a mint julep.”

C.S. Lewis “The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch & The Wardrobe” (1950): Turkish Delight

“The Queen let another drop fall from her bottle on to the snow and instantly there appeared a round box, tied with green silk ribbon, which, when opened turned out to contain several pounds of the best Turkish Delight. Each piece was sweet and light to the very center and Edmond and never tasted anything more delicious.”

Bonus Food for “The Lion, The Witch & The Wardrobe”: Marmalade rolls 

“And when they had finished the fish, Mrs Beaver brought unexpectedly out of the oven a great and gloriously sticky marmalade roll, steaming hot, and at the same time moved the kettle onto the fire, so that when they had finished the marmalade roll the tea was made and ready to be poured out.” 

Roald Dahl’s “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” (1964): Bill’s Candy Shop

“Eatable marshmallow pillows. Lickable wallpaper for nurseries. Hot ice creams for cold days. Cows that give chocolate milk. Fizzy lifting drinks. Square sweets that look round.” 

Jonathan L Howard’s “Johannes Cabal the Necromancer” (2009): Peas

(Ed note: a bit gruesome ) 

Then, one morning, the surviving family woke up and found themselves short one for breakfast. They discovered Beatrice tied by her ankles to the chandelier. Her expression was one of purest horror and she was quite dead. There were a lot of peas in the room. The post-mortem discovered another five pounds of them forced down her throat, jamming her esophagus shut and clogging her airways.

Extra: Characters from the Johannes Cabal universe. From left: Satan, Frank Barrow, Leonie Barrow, Johannes Cabal, Horst Cabal, Bones the Carnival Manager, Dennis and Denzil, and Layla the Latex Lady. Image courtesy of AgarthianGuide on Deviantart.com. Here’s the link for more of her Johannes Cabal images: https://www.deviantart.com/agarthanguide/art/Johannes-Cabal-the-Necromancer-Linup-590426600

Neil Gaiman’s “American Gods” (2001): Chili 

Laura made a great chili. She used lean meat, dark kidney beans, carrots cut small, a bottle or so of dark beer, and freshly sliced hot peppers. She would let the chili cook awhile, then add red wine, lemon juice and a pinch of fresh dill, and finally, measure out and add her chili powders. On more than one occasion, Shadow had tried to get her to show him how she made it: he would watch everything she did…………….

(Ed note: have you seen the series on Starz? Season 3 just dropped the other night!) 

Edward Gorey’s “The Gashleycrumb Tinies” (1963): Peaches 

“E is for Ernest who choked on a peach”.

Douglas Adams’ “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” (1979): Zaphod Beeblebrox’s Pan Galactic Gargle Blaster

Take the juice from one bottle of the Ol’ Janx Spirit.

Pour into it one measure of water from the seas of Santraginus V — Oh, that Santraginean water… Oh, those Santraginean fish!

Allow three cubes of Arcturan Mega-gin to melt into the mixture (it must be properly iced or the benzine is lost)

Allow four liters of Fallian marsh gas to bubble through it, in memory of all those happy hikers who have died of pleasure in the Marshes of Fallia

Over the back of a silver spoon float a measure of Qualactin Hypermint extract, redolent of all the heady odors of the dark Qualactin Zones, subtle, sweet, and mystic

Drop in the tooth of an Algolian Suntiger. Watch it dissolve, spreading the fires of the Algolian Suns deep into the heart of the drink

Sprinkle Zamphour

Add an olive

Drink… but…..very carefully…

The Pan Galactic Gargle Blaster’s effect is described as “having your brains smashed out by a slice of lemon, wrapped ’round a large gold brick.” Or “the alcoholic equivalent to a mugging; expensive and bad for the head.”

Stephen King’s “The Shining”: Wendy’s canned tomato soup and cheese omelette 

“She opened the can and dropped the slightly jellied contents into a saucepan. PLOP. She went to the refrigerator and got milk and eggs for the omelet. Then to the walk-in freezer for cheese. All these actions, so common and so much a part of her life before the Overlook, had been a part of her life, helped to calm her. She melted butter in the frying pan, diluted the soup with milk, then poured the beaten eggs into the pan. A sudden feeling that someone was standing behind her, reaching for her throat.”

Douglas Adams’ “The Restaurant at the End of the Universe” (1980): Bovine Quadrupeds

Miliways serves Large fat meaty quadrupeds of the bovine type, with large watery eyes, small horns and what might almost be ingratiating smiles.”

Marcel Proust’s “Remembrance of Things Past” (English version,1922): Madeleines 

“She sent out for one of those short, plump little cakes called ‘petites madeleines,’ which look as though they had been moulded in the fluted scallop of a pilgrim’s shell. And soon, mechanically, weary after a dull day with the prospect of a depressing morrow, I raised to my lips a spoonful of the tea in which I had soaked a morsel of the cake. No sooner had the warm liquid, and the crumbs with it, touched my palate, a shudder ran through my whole body, and I stopped, intent upon the extraordinary changes that were taking place.”

Steven Brust’s “Cowboy Feng’s Space Bar & Grille” (1990): Matzo Ball Soup

“Cowboy Feng’s Space Bar and Grille has the best matzo ball soup in the galaxy. Lots of garlic, matzo balls with just the right consistency to absorb the flavor, big chunks of chicken, and the whole of it seasoned to a biting perfection. One bowl, along with maybe a couple of tamales, will usually do for a meal.”

J.K. Rowling’s “Harry Potter & The Sorcerer’s Stone” (1997): Pastys

He had never had any money for sweets with the Dursleys, and now that he had pockets rattling with gold and silver he was ready to buy as many Mars Bars as he could carry — but the woman didn’t have Mars Bars. What she did have were Bertie Bott’s Every Flavor Beans, Drooble’s Best Blowing Gum, Chocolate Frogs. Pumpkin Pasties, Cauldron Cakes, Licorice Wands, and a number of other strange things Harry had never seen in his life.
Not wanting to miss anything, he got some of everything and paid the woman eleven silver Sickles and seven bronze Knuts. Ron stared as Harry brought it all back in to the compartment and tipped it onto an empty seat.
“Hungry, are you?”
“Starving,” said Harry, taking a large bite out of a pumpkin pasty.
Ron had taken out a lumpy package and unwrapped it. There were four sandwiches inside. He pulled one of them apart and said, “She always forgets I don’t like corned beef.”
“Swap you for one of these,” said Harry, holding up a pasty. “Go on –“
“You don’t want this, it’s all dry,” said Ron. “She hasn’t got much time,” he added quickly, “you know, with five of us.”
“Go on, have a pasty,” said Harry, who had never had anything to share before or, indeed, anyone to share it with. It was a nice feeling, sitting there with Ron, eating their way through all Harry’s pasties, cakes, and sweets (the sandwiches lay forgotten).

Truman Capote’s “In Cold Blood” (1965): Shrimp, French Fries, Garlic Bread. Ice cream and strawberries and whipped cream

“Read in the paper, afternoon paper, what they ordered for their last meal? Ordered the same menu. Shrimp. French fries. Garlic bread. Ice cream and strawberries and whipped cream. Understand Smith didn’t touch his much.”

Harper Lee’s “To Kill A Mockingbird” (1960): Calpurnia’s Crackling Bread

“Perhaps Calpurnia sensed that my day had been a grim one: she let me watch her fix supper. ‘Shut your eyes and open your mouth and I’ll give you a surprise,’ she said. It was not often that she made crackling bread, she said she never had time, but with both of us at school today had been an easy one for her. She knew I loved crackling bread.”

Roald Dahl’s “Matilda” (1988): Chocolate Cake

“The cook disappeared. Almost at once she was back again staggering under the weight of an enormous round chocolate cake on a china platter. The cake was fully eighteen inches in diameter and it was covered with dark-brown chocolate icing.”

And in the immortal words of Erma Bombeck…

“Seize the moment.
Remember all those women on the ‘Titanic’ who waved off the dessert cart.”

What`s your favorite literary recipe or reference? Leave a comment down below!

Featured image: The Mad Hatter’s Tea Party – Lewis Carroll’s Alice In Wonderland, from the color illustrated Nursery Alice, 1890.

Posted in From The Editor's Desk, Literature, Travel

Literary Tour: New Orleans

I’ve recently become enamored with the literary tours around the country that delve deep into the writing history of the city you are visiting.  I thought I would share with you, my readers, some of the cities that I’d like to visit and what you can do there, if you are a bibliophile like I am.

I’ve visited New Orleans while driving across country from New York to California, and had a wonderful time. It is one of those places on my bucket list to go back and spend some serious time exploring. The literary history just calls to me, so if you are nearby, please take advantage of it and let me know what you think.

Without further ado, come with me as we stroll Crescent City.

Hotel Monteleone
214 Royal St., between Bienville and Iberville Streets

history_literary
Photo courtesy of The Hotel Monteleone

Hotel Monteleone, a historic New Orleans hotel, has long been a favorite haunt of distinguished Southern authors. Many of them immortalized the Grand Dame of the French Quarter in their works. Ernest Hemingway, Tennessee Williams, and William Faulkner always made 214 Royal Street their address while in the Crescent City.

In 1999, the hotel was designated an official literary landmark by the Friends of the Library Association. (The Plaza and Algonquin in New York are the only other hotels in the United States that share this honor.)

Did you know… You can request the Literary Suites at the Hotel Monteleone, and stay in William Faulkner, Truman Capote, Ernest Hemingway, or the Eudora Welty Suite.

Tennessee Williams Home – A Streetcar Named Desire
1014 Dumaine Street, New Orleans, LA 70116

“Don’t you just love those long rainy afternoons in New Orleans when an hour isn’t just an hour – but a little piece of eternity dropped into your hands – and who knows what to do with it?”
~Blanche Dubois

http://www.hnoc.org/collections/tw/twpathindex.html

Tennessee-tux-300

If you’re  planning a trip, there’s the Tennessee Williams/ New Orleans Literary Festival.  being held March 24 – March 28, 2021 (hopefully!).

The Tennessee Williams/New Orleans Literary Festival was founded in 1986 by a group of local citizens who shared a common desire to celebrate the region’s rich cultural heritage.

Don’t forget the Stella and Stanley Shouting Contest!

William Faulkner House
624 Pirate’s Alley, around the corner from St. Louis Cathedral

A little byway to get to the Faulkner House Books

Faulkner-plaque

http://www.nola.com/homegarden/index.ssf/2009/11/william_faulkner_house_in_new.html

Food and Drink… 

Jean Lafitte’s Old Absinthe House
240 Bourbon Street,
corner of Bourbon and Bienville

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Be sure to stop for a drink at the Old Absinthe House, where P.T. Barnum, Mark Twain, Oscar Wilde, General Robert E. Lee, Frank Sinatra, and Enrico Caruso have come through the doors. The story goes, that Pirate Jean Lafitte and Andrew Jackson planned the Battle of New Orleans there.

Try the Absinthe Frappe (Herbsaint, Anisette, soda water) invented there by Cayetano Ferrer!

Antoine’s Restaurant
713 St. Louis St, New Orleans, LA 70130

Open since 1840, Antoine’s Restaurant has been part of Crescent City history. Franklin Roosevelt, Pope John Paul II, The Rolling Stones, Bob Hope and Bing Crosby have all dined at Antoine’s. Be sure to have the Oysters Rockefeller, try the Baked Alaska, and have a drink at the Hermes Bar (725 St. Louis St.).

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Finish off your days of wandering with some Coffee !

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French Truck Coffee
217 Chartres Street, New Orleans, LA 70130

This coffee is so good, (my daughter had it while she was performing with her high school jazz band on their NOLA trip right before the coronavirus hit), that we have it shipped to us! When the ROUGAROU coffee comes back in season, I recommend that. One can’t go wrong with LE GRAND COQ ROUGE and LA BELLE NOIR.

or:

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PJ’s Coffee – Lower Garden District
2140 Magazine Street, New Orleans, LA 70130

For cold drinks, try the Original Cold Brew Iced Coffee or the Velvet Ice Frozen Blended in either Mocha or Vanilla.

PS: If you want to delve into local history, let me introduce you to my very good friend, and client, Edward Branley. He is a font of knowledge, having written five books on NOLA history, as well as fiction novels.

Posted in From The Editor's Desk, Words

Favorite Words, Recommenced…

If you recall, back in… October… (seems like a lifetime ago in this pandemic), I had a post titled “FAVORITE WORDS and why I love them”. I promised you my next set of words… and here they are. What are your favorite words? Do they come from grandma, family jokes, or a book ? Let me know in the comments.

Petrichor

(n): the scent of rain on the earth

pronounciation: pet-ri-kawr, pe-trahy-kawr

Psithurism

(n): the sound of the wind through the trees

Scripturient

(adj): having a consuming passion to write

Callipygian

(adj.): having shapely buttocks

pronounciation: kal-uhpij-ee-uhn

Palimpsest

(n): writing material used one or more times after earlier writing has been erased; something with diverse layers or aspects apparent beneath the surface.

pronounciation: pal-imp-sest 

Editor Note: Check out the ghost ads that I am researching, since palimpsest is one of my current favorite words from that! Also, be on the lookout for the “FADED” book I’m working on with Edward Branley.

Posted in Quote, Writing

Writing Tip: Facts

Facts, facts, facts; there is nothing but facts.  The writer’s first business is to get at these facts exactly —get the meat out of them— and then, by the most direct method, to transmit them to his readers.  That is the whole substructure of literature; the groundwork —the anatomy.”

—Wolstan Dixey

The Trade of Authorship, 1888, p. 83

Posted in History

Pandemics and Quarantine Through the Ages

What a long, strange trip it’s been since March 2020, when the latest pandemic has hit the country, Coronavirus (COVID-19). Almost 7 months later, we are still wearing masks, using hand sanitizer, and practicing staying 6 feet apart from those of us who aren’t in a nuclear family.  Personally, my college freshman daughter is doing her first semester online, over Zoom calls. This is complicated!

All of this has got me thinking about the past Pandemics and Quarantines through the ages. We’ve had our share: Antonine Plague (165-180), Japanese Smallpox (735-737), The Black Death (1346-1353), Great Plague of London (1665), Philadelphia Yellow Fever (1793), Cholera Pandemics 1-6 (1817-1923),  American Polio epidemic (1916), The Spanish Flu (1918-1919), HIV/AIDS (1981-current), American Ebola epidemic (2014-2016)… the list is massive. For a great visual representation of the history of pandemics, check out https://www.visualcapitalist.com/history-of-pandemics-deadliest/

By now you all should know that I’m a research nut, and love going down rabbit holes. After spending a couple days poring over scientific journals and articles on quarantine, pandemics, epidemics and the like, I realized after a certain amount of time, these things die off; or go silent until we wake it up again.

So, enough rambling… onto the main event: “Pandemics & Quarantine Through the Ages.”

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC), in its history of quarantine and isolation, says, “The practice of quarantine, as we know it, began during the 14th century in an effort to protect coastal cities from plague epidemics. Ships arriving in Venice from infected ports were required to sit at anchor for 40 days before landing. This practice, called quarantine, was derived from the Italian words quaranta giorni which mean 40 days.”

This order came from the Adriatic port city of Ragusa (modern day Dubrovnik), which survived and in the Dubrovnik archives city records said that on July 27, 1377 they voted on a proposal that went into law that stated “those who come from plague infested areas shall not enter Dubrovnik or its district unless they previously spend a month on the islet of Mrkan (a nearby uninhabited island) or in the town of Catvat, (a small town south of Dubrovnik) for the purposes of disinfection.”

Did you know? 40 days was chosen because the number had great significance both religiously and historically. Think of Noah’s Ark (40 days/ 40 nights of rain when God flooded the earth); Jesus fasted in the wilderness for 40 days; Jewish people wandered the desert for 40 years.

Alex Chase-Levenson, assistant professor of history at the University of Pennsylvania, discussed the first British guide for travelers to Egypt in a guidebook from the 1840s: “Almost the whole introduction was about dealing with quarantine on the return trip. A central rationale for this system was the occasional presence of bubonic plague epidemics in Middle Eastern cities, but even when there were no reports of any disease, every person traveling from the Middle East to Western Europe needed to be quarantined, usually for at least three weeks … The quarantine system ensnared millions of people over its existence, roughly from the mid-eighteenth century to the 1850s. These people had to have their clothes fumigated, had to hand over every piece of mail to be dipped in vinegar and smoked. Sometimes, you can still smell that on early nineteenth-century letters.1

Broadsheets like this one produced for the Parish of Clerkenwell announced outbreaks like cholera, and its symptoms and remedies.

In the Louvre hangs Antoine-Jean Gros’ 1804 work “Napoleon Bonaparte Visiting the Plague- Stricken of Jaffa,” depicting Napoleon’s Syria campaign in March 1799. “Bonaparte, who had become First Consul, wanted it to help clear the accusations of the British press, who had alleged that he had wanted to execute the plague-stricken during his retreat to Cairo. The painting, presented at the 1804 Salon shortly before his coronation – a particularly opportune moment for Bonaparte – is the first masterpiece of Napoleonic history painting.”

Antoine-Jean Gros “Napoleon Bonaparte visiting the Plague-Stricken of Jaffa” 1804, Louvre.

A takeaway from Chase-Levenson: “Quarantine is really the oldest precedent that the government needed to invest itself in the health of the nation as a whole, that putting money from taxation behind a medical measure was legitimate. So, it’s a crucial precedent for our modern understanding that the state should be responsible for public health, for the wellbeing of its citizens. Also: Long before there were passport control lines, quarantine constituted a major border regime. There are many ways this system shaped our understanding of what modern states should do.”2

Interested in knowing more? Book Doctor Dara recommends:


Zlata Blazina Tomic and Vesna Blazina’s book Expelling the Plague: The Health Office and the Implementation of Quarantine in Dubrovnik, 1377-1533, was published by McGill-Queen’s University Press in 2015.

Jane Stevens Crawshaw’s article, “The Renaissance Invention of Quarantine,” appears in The Fifteenth Century XII: Society in an Age of Plague, edited by Linda Clark and Carole Rawcliffe, and published in 2013.

Note: The Featured Image is an 1892 map detailing the cases of the Russian flu pandemic across the globe in 16 different time periods, from May 1889 to October 1890 from The National Library of Medicine.

Posted in Words

Favorite Words, and why I love them

Do you have a word list, a list of favorite words that you have kept forever? I do. I guess I’ve always been fascinated by words, how they roll of my tongue, when they bring shock, or awe to a conversation. “How do you know this word? Where did you hear that?”

Some words are meant to be spread out in the world, some are meant for those quiet, introspective times, and some are those personal words meant for one-on-one with your significant other, spouse, or lover; bedroom talk that you’d embarrass your kids with if it came out in mixed company.

I remember using a word in a conversation with my dad when I was in college. He looked at me and said “well, I know that’s worth every bit of education you’re getting- that’s a COLLEGE level word!”

I’ve decided to share some of them with you, I’m thinking of making this a weekly thing for a few weeks, and I’m always interested in knowing : What is YOUR favorite word, and why?

Without any further adieu, here’s the start of the “My Favorite Words” list – in no particular order ( of course I have Julie Andrews singing “My Favorite Things” – music by Richard Rodgers and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein in my head as I type this).

1736 Canting Dictionary page image courtesy of http://www.fromoldbooks.org

Fernweh

(n, German): An ache for distant places; the craving for travel

pronounciation: FEIRN-veyh

Sehnsucht

(n, German): “The inconsolable longing in the human heart for we know not what”; yearning for a far, familiar, non-earthly land one can identify as one’s home.

pronounciation: /zeɪnˌzʊxt/

Note: Sehnsucht is divisible into two parts: Sehn from sehnen (to yearn)  and Sucht (addiction, craving).

Gezellig

(adj, Dutch): Describes an atmosphere that is warm, softly lit, airy and friendly

pronounciation: heh-SELL-ick

Back in the day I had notebooks full of words, (remember composition notebooks?), now I invite you to join me on my “Wordsmithing” pinterest board and see that I am seriously a crazy word lover.

Until next time,

Dara

Posted in Did You Know ?, Writing

Margins of Protection

#the more you know…


Those margins weren’t inserted as a guide for how many sentences you should fit onto a page, or even to leave space for notes. Manufacturers started applying margins to writing paper to protect your work as rats used to be common in many people’s homes and would snack on paper.

Applying a wide border to paper safeguarded against losing important work by leaving space around the sides for the rats to chew through first, and to protect the writing on the outer edges from general wear and tear.